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Cote d'Ivoire

In Côte d’Ivoire, every story counts: New computerized personnel and wage management system has improved employee satisfaction and effectiveness in the civil service

Taleb Ould Sid’Ahmed's picture
New computerized personnel and wage management system has improved employee satisfaction and effectiveness in the civil service



The story of a country’s economic development is often told through the lens of new roads, factories, power lines, and ports. However, it can also be told through the voices of everyday heroes, individuals who have taken action to improve their lives, and those around them. In this blog series, the World Bank Group, in partnership with the Ivorian newspaper Fraternité Matin and blogger Edith Brou, tells the stories of those individuals who, with a boost from a Bank project, have set economic development in motion in their communities.

Jacques Dongo, Inspector of Guidance Services in the Ministry of National Education and Vocational Training, proudly exhibits his loan certificate, the key to making some of his dreams come true. As we chatted with him in front of a counter in the Ministry of the Civil Service and Modernization of the Administration, he acknowledged the benefits of the new integrated civil service personnel management system (SIGFAE): “Before this system was set up, it was a game of cat and mouse between the ‘margouillats,’ or notorious intermediaries, and government departments to obtain documents. The introduction of the new system has completely changed this. It has taken me just 3 days to obtain this document once I fulfilled all the requirements.”

In Côte d’Ivoire, every story counts 6: toward patient-centric hospitals

Jacques Morisset's picture
In Côte d’Ivoire, every story counts 6: toward patient-centric hospitals



The story of a country’s economic development is often told through the lens of new roads, factories, power plants, and ports. However, it can also be told through the voices of everyday heroes, individuals who have taken action to improve their lives and those around them. In this blog series, the World Bank Group, in partnership with Ivorian newspaper Fraternité Matin and blogger Edith Brou, tells the stories of those individuals who, with a boost from a Bank project, have set economic development in motion in their communities.

About Sofie immediately felt reassured on her arrival for treatment at the Bagba Health Center in southern Côte d’Ivoire: “As soon as you go through the door, the nurse’s aides put you at ease with a smile. In other places, you’re scared and you think twice before talking to the medical personnel, who are quick to belittle patients and walk away.”

When resilience means leaving your home and making a new one

Margaret Arnold's picture

© Margaret Arnold/ World Bank

Along the beach in Mondouku, Côte d'Ivoire, a group of fishermen have just returned with their catch. Many of them come from neighboring Ghana, and they tell us that they come to the Ivorian part of the coast because there are more fish here. Still, they explain that the fish are smaller in size and number compared to previous years. The beach they are sitting on is lined with small hotels and cabanas destroyed in a storm surges over the past few years. A bit further down the coast, near the Vridi Canal, we speak with Conde Abdoulaye, who runs the lobster restaurant that his father ran before him. Even at low tide, the water laps against the steps of the restaurant and a retaining wall which he has rebuilt numerous times. He says he knows it is inevitable that at some point the sea will swallow his restaurant, and he will have to leave. He blames the canal for most of the beach erosion, but also acknowledges that changing weather patterns and increasing storms have contributed to the damage.

Paris Léona, a community at the heart of development

Jacques Morisset's picture
© Dasan Bobo /World Bank


The story of a country’s economic development is often told through the lens of new roads, factories, power lines, and ports. However, it can also be told through the voices of every day heroes, individuals who have taken action to improve their lives and those around them. In this blog series, the World Bank Group, in partnership with the Ivorian newspaper Fraternité Matin and blogger Edith Brou, tells the stories of those individuals who, with a boost from a Bank project, have set economic development in motion in their communities.

“Preparing kabato used to be a grueling task,” explains Salimata Koné, a resident in the village of Paris Léona, located some 500 kilometers to the north west of Abidjan. The women in the village usually had to toil away with mortars and pestles to produce this corn meal that fed the entire family. This laborious activity ended when Salimata Koné and other women in the village participated in the budget discussions led by the village chief, providing them with the opportunity to acquire a mill in their community. Since then, life has been much easier.

In Côte d’Ivoire, every story counts: Bridging schools allow Ivorian children to make up for lost time

Taleb Ould Sid’Ahmed's picture


 

The story of a country’s economic development is often told through the lens of new roads, factories, power lines, and ports. However, it can also be told through the voices of every day heroes, individuals who have taken action to improve their lives and those around them. In this blog series, the World Bank Group, in partnership with the Ivorian newspaper Fraternité Matin and blogger Edith Brou, tells the stories of those individuals who, with a boost from a Bank project, have set economic development in motion in their communities.

Young Soulama Siaka is dressed in his khaki school uniform and is sitting quietly next to his uncle, Kone Birama, in the yard of their family home. The bare yard reflects the destitution of his family after the political crisis. “I couldn’t even afford to send my children to school,” he says. Children drop out of school nearly everywhere in Côte d’Ivoire because their families cannot afford the tuition fees.

In Côte d’Ivoire, every story counts: How one bridge transformed rural access to markets

Jacques Morisset's picture

 

The story of a country’s economic development is often told through the lens of new roads, factories, power lines, and ports. However, it can also be told through the voices of every day heroes, individuals who have taken action to improve their lives and those around them. 

In this blog series, the World Bank Group, in partnership with the Ivorian newspaper Fraternité Matin and blogger Edith Brou, tells the stories of those individuals who, with a boost from a Bank project, have set economic development in motion in their communities. 

Partnering to measure impacts of private sector projects on job creation

Alvaro Gonzalez's picture
Worker in Ghana
For the poor and vulnerable of the world, jobs are key to ending poverty and driving development. But not all jobs are equally transformational.  
Photo: Jonathan Ernst / World Bank

Jobs are what we earn, what we do, and sometimes even who we are. For the poor and vulnerable of the world, jobs are key to ending poverty and driving development. But not all jobs are equally transformational. Good jobs add value to society, taking into account the benefits they have on the people who hold them, and the potential spillover effects on others. For example, inclusive jobs, such as those that employ women, can change the way families spend money and invest in the education and health of children.  

Quality education for all: measuring progress in Francophone Africa

Raja Bentaouet Kattan's picture
 
Despite notable gains in expanding access, countries in West Africa still face a great challenge in providing a quality education for all. Photo: Ami Vitale / The World Bank


Quality education is one of the most powerful instruments for reducing poverty and inequality; yet it remains elusive in many parts of the world. The Programme for the Analysis of Education Systems (PASEC), which is designed to assess student abilities in mathematics and reading in French, has for the first time delivered an internationally comparable measure around which policy dialogue and international cooperation can aspire to improve. The PASEC 2014 international student assessment was administered in 10 countries in Francophone West Africa (Cameroon, Burundi, Republic of Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Senegal, Chad, Togo, Benin, Burkina Faso, and Niger).

What’s behind poor education outcomes in Côte d’Ivoire?

Jacques Morisset's picture
Today, young Ivorian students spend on average only eight years in the classroom while pupils in emerging countries spend almost the double (14 years). As if this wasn’t worrisome enough, studies show that this gap has widened over time and that the quality of education has deteriorated. At the end of the primary school cycle, less than half of Ivorian students have the required reading or mathematics skills, as evidenced in the graph below. These statistics illustrate the extent of the effort needed to make up for lost time, a challenge that the Ivorian authorities are set on tackling as the country embarks on the path of emergence.
 
And for good reason. Countries such as South Korea and Malaysia have succeeded in transitioning to emerging market status thanks to their investments in building some of the best education systems in the world. For the Nobel Prize winner in economics, Robert Lucas Jr. and the  World Bank’s chief economist, Paul Romer, economic development depends above all on a country's ability to value its human capital. This not only allows the country to increase its current added value but also to create tomorrow’s technological innovations.
 
 Employment Benchmark, 2016.)
This graph presents a regional comparison of the acquisition of mathematics and French skills at the end of the primary school cycle.
(Source: World Bank, Côte d'Ivoire: Employment Benchmark, 2016.)

In Côte d’Ivoire, every story counts

Taleb Ould Sid’Ahmed's picture
 Taleb Ould Sid'ahmed/World Bank Côte d'Ivoire

I met Prince Brokou four years ago in 2013, when he joined a road maintenance group as part of the Youth Employment and Skills Development Project (PEJEDEC) funded by the World Bank. At the time, he was still living with his parents in Yopougon, a sprawling suburb of Abidjan.

Brokou performed labor-intensive public works such as clearing out detritus from clogged road gutters that result in flooding during Côte d’Ivoire’s rainy season. This short-term activity allowed him to earn a monthly salary of CFAF 60,000 (about $124) for six months, and receive training on how to set up a small business to ensure his transition to future employment. He was also able to benefit from classes on civics, community development, public health, HIV/AIDS, and the environment.

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