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The World Region

A case for contextual data filters?

Sameer Vasta's picture

This afternoon, I had the pleasure of sitting in a session on information visualization by Ben Shneiderman of the University of Maryland Human-Computer Interaction Lab. In his presentation, Shneiderman shared one of his mantras when it comes to visualizing information:

Overview, zoom & filter, details on demand.

The Reading List: May 22

Sameer Vasta's picture

Apologies for the lack of posts this week: I've been at the O'Reilly Where 2.0 Conference learning more about the geo-spatial web. Lots of neat things coming out of the conference, and I'll be posting more about them in the days to come, promise. In the meantime...

Every Friday — well, Saturday this week — I'm going to try and post a selection of the links from our delicious.com account so you can get a quick snapshot of what we're reading this week. Here goes:
 

"ICT is both an icon and an engine of innovation"

Michael Trucano's picture

image courtesy of infoDevAt the end of last week's blog post I mentioned the new Educational Technology Debate web site sponsored by infoDev and UNESCO.  Every month, this site will offer up a topic for consideration, and two discussants will stake out positions on (roughly) opposite sides to kick off what is meant to be a lively on-line 'back-and-forth' in the subsequent weeks.  The first question for debate asks,

The Reading List: May 8

Sameer Vasta's picture

Every day, there are a ton of really great articles and posts on the web that pique our interest here at the Web Program Office. We've decided to start a delicious.com account to keep a track of a few of them that we'd like to share.

Every Friday, I'm going to try and post a selection of the links from our delicious.com account so you can get a quick snapshot of what we're reading this week. Here goes:

 

What have we learned from OLPC pilots to date?

Michael Trucano's picture

CC licensed photo courtesy of Daniel Drake via Flickr It's been four years since the The One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) project (known then as the '$100 laptop) was announced.   According to recent unconfirmed news reports from India, one quarter million of the little green and white OLPC XO laptops are now on order for use in 1500 hundred schools on the subcontinent.  Four years on, what have we learned about the impact of various OLPC pilots that might be of relevance to a deployment in India?  Thankfully, preliminary results are starting to circulate among researchers.  While nothing yet has approached what many consider to be the gold standard of evaluation work in this area, some of this research is beginning to see the light of day (or at least the Internet) -- and more is planned.

2 weeks to Go!

Aaron Leonard's picture

Dear readers,

Proposals for the 2009 Global Development Marketplace are due in 2 weeks! There is still plenty of time to apply. We hope you take advantage and submit your idea today. The competition, funded by the GEF and other DM partners, aims to dentify 20 to 25 innovative, early-stage projects addressing climate adaptation. Winning projects receive up to US$200,000 in grant funding for implementation over two years.

The competition focuses on three sub-themes: 
  1) Resilience of Indigenous Peoples' Communities to Climate Risks
  2) Climate Risk Management with Multiple Benefits
  3) Climate Adaptation and Disaster Risk Management

For more information and to apply, visit our website at www.developmentmarketplace.org. The application deadline is May 18, 2009.

www.developmentmarketplace.org

Education and Technology in an Age of Pandemics

Michael Trucano's picture

image used according to the terms of its Creative Commons license; image courtesy of Edgar Antonio Villaseñor González via FlickrFor some people in other parts of the world, it was the picture of two top Mexican futbol teams playing earlier this week in an empty Estadio Azteca (one of the world's largest capacity stadiums) that made clear the severity of the current swine flu outbreak.  While the sporting passions of the 100,000 missing spectators could presumably satisfied by watching the game on TV, it was less clear how to immediately satisfy the learning needs of over seven million students who were sent home after their schools were ordered closed.

Many educational reformers have long held out hope that computers and other information and computer technologies (ICTs) can play crucial and integral roles in bringing about long-needed changes to education systems.  Indeed, many see the introduction of ICTs in schools as a sort of Trojan horse, out of which educational reform and innovation can spring once inside the walls of the traditional (conservative) education establishment. While not denying the potentially transformational impact of ICT use to help meet a wide variety of educational objectives, history has shown that bringing about positive disruptive change isn't achieved by simply flooding schools with computers and related ICTs.

As a result of swine flu, many Mexican schools are experiencing quick, disruptive change of a different sort right now.  How might technology be relevant in cases like this?  Given the status quo, the use of technology in schools isn't enough to bring about systemic change.  But: How might ICTs be useful, even transformational, when this status quo is severely disrupted by some other exogenous factor ... like a pandemic disease outbreak?


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