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Public private partnership

Strategic investment funds and government innovations for infrastructure development

Rajiv Sharma's picture


Photo Credit: Axel Drainville via Flickr Creative Commons

Our research at the Stanford Global Projects Center aims to improve the way institutional capital is invested in critical public infrastructure. On one side, we research how institutional investor capital that has a commercial objective can be pooled most efficiently for infrastructure. On the other side we research government policies and practices to procure infrastructure assets through Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs) and other methods most effectively. In this blog we highlight a few specific initiatives that have been set up to achieve these two objectives holistically, a few of which we touched upon in our first blog.
 

The Global Infrastructure Project Pipeline: Linking private investors with public infrastructure projects

Richard Timbs's picture



In 2014, the Brisbane G20 Leaders’ Summit tasked its newly announced Global Infrastructure Hub with ensuring there is a “comprehensive, open-source project pipeline database, connected to national and multilateral development bank databases, to help match potential investors with projects.”
 
The G20, based on advice from the B20 (a private sector forum) had recognized a key issue for the private sector: the lack of clear and consistent early stage information on government infrastructure projects across the globe.
 
Private investors armed with billions of dollars were being hamstrung by a lack of useful and informative data to guide their planning for investments.

PPPs need PALS

Malcolm Morley's picture



In my previous blogs I have argued that to realize the potential of Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs), the public sector needs to develop Public to Public Partnerships (P2P Partnerships). The more the public sector can work as P2P Partnerships, the more it can change the economic and social value achievable by PPPs above what the public sector can achieve alone.
 
As P2P Partnerships develop to create an increased scale and scope of PPP opportunities, so too will the need for the private sector to evolve to enable it to respond to those opportunities. This may be in the form of diversified organizations or consortia of private sector organizations through Private to Private Partnerships (Pr2Pr Partnerships).
 
A key test of organizations seeking to achieve “joint working” (working collaboratively or in partnership together) whether for PPPs, P2P Partnerships, or Pr2Pr Partnerships, is whether they have PALS. PALS is an acronym for the key activities in joint working that stand for Prioritize, Aggregate, Learn and Share.

Infrastructure is rewarding…but requires patience

Bayo Oyewole's picture

Developing viable infrastructure projects is tough in the best of circumstances. And over the last few years I’ve learned, first-hand, that developing them in emerging markets and developing countries is even tougher. That’s the main reason I joined the small-but-dedicated team of the Global Infrastructure Facility (GIF).
 
The GIF – which was formed only two years ago – looks to attract private finance to infrastructure projects in those countries that most need it. We serve as a platform where governments can collaborate with international financial institutions and private sector investors to design, structure and implement these complex projects. The potential is big – funding from GIF can lead to multi-million dollar projects at close.

Three ways to partner with cities and municipalities to mobilize private capital for infrastructure

Sara Perea Sigrist's picture



When seeking to engage private partners, one thinks of large, high-cost national infrastructure projects. But subnational governments are also effectively partnering with the private sector by leveraging assets, rethinking “infrastructure,” and establishing mechanisms to give long-term security.
 
Some Latin American governments are capitalizing on legislative frameworks for Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs)—in some cases tailoring laws for subnational use, and using experience gained from large-scale national projects.
 
While not always technically PPPs, this private sector capacity can be harnessed to deliver innovative smaller projects, from using drones to deliver medicines to health centers in rural communities in the Dominican Republic to building market stalls in a new Honduran bus terminal to spur the development of small businesses.
 
Here are three ways cities and municipalities can mobilize capital and innovation in infrastructure.
 

From stadiums to gendarmeries: a new generation of public-payment PPPs in France

François Bergere's picture


The Stade Vélodrome in Marseille, France. Photo Credit: Ben Sutherland via Flickr Creative Commons

In June 2016, nearly 2.5 million enthusiastic spectators gathered in France to attend the Euro 2016 soccer tournament.

Those participating in matches in Lille, Bordeaux, Marseille or Nice would have noticed the brand new facilities and bold architectural design, but most probably didn’t realize these stadiums had been either constructed or modernized with financing through the relatively new “Contrat de partenariat” public-private partnership (PPP) scheme.

Resuming PPPs in Sri Lanka – now or never?

Amali Rajapaksa's picture



Sri Lanka has, over the past decade, relied primarily on public funds for most of its infrastructure needs that have come by way of borrowing on concessional and non-concessional terms with limited attempts being made to develop infrastructure with the use of private funds. However, the infrastructure gap continues to widen with the growing limitations in borrowing capacity, and the government is under pressure to deliver infrastructure adhering to practices of good governance and transparency.

The recent budget shed light on several areas where the government could engage the private sector through public-private partnerships (PPPs). Could this bring about accelerated development in infrastructure that the limited amount of public finance alone would not be able to handle?

Devolution of PPP enabling environment institutions: The leadership cascade effect

David Baxter's picture



I have seen several trends emerge from discussions I have had over the past year with PPP public sector practitioners about the ability of their government institutions to promote PPP best practices and enhance enabling environments:

In India, a hospital that’s just what the doctor ordered

Pankaj Sinha's picture



The Indian State of Bihar, by population, is larger than the Philippines. Or, if you prefer, by the number of residents, Bihar would be the 13th largest country in the world. Yet Bihar’s health indicators are consistently worse than India’s average. And despite accounting for nearly 9% of India’s population, not a single specialty health facility in Bihar is among the nearly 340 Indian hospitals accredited by the National Accreditation Board of Hospitals & Healthcare Providers.

The combination of a high population and a significant lack of quality specialty healthcare facilities has a profound negative impact on the people of Bihar. This is an onerous burden in a state that is already one of the five poorest in India, with a per capita income only half of that of the country as a whole.


Wanted: someone to energize infrastructure projects across the Caribbean

Paul da Rita's picture


 

On a recent trip to the Caribbean, I was in a meeting at the Ministry of Finance of one of the region’s largest economies. The topic under discussion was all too familiar: the difficulty of attracting overseas investment into the country’s public infrastructure projects.

To enliven things, I began thinking aloud about an idea I’d been musing on for a while and was asked to outline my idea. Let me first set the context.


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